Archive for the ‘WATER’ Category

Titano-magnetite New Zealand may approve underwater mine

Saturday, July 26th, 2014

New Zealand may approve underwater iron sands mine

new-zealand-may-approve-first-underwater-mine-image www.www-globalcommodities.com

New Zealand will announce Wednesday the fate of Trans Tasman Resources (TTR) $70 million underwater iron sand project, which could become the world’s first commercial metals operation on the ocean floor, off the country’s west coast.

Backed by Australian, American and New Zealand investors, the mine will suck in iron-rich seafloor sands, to later extract the desired titano-magnetite for export to Asian steel mills, with about 90% of the sand being returned to the bottom of the sea.

According to Reuters, if South Taranaki Bight project is approved it will encourage others looking to mine copper, cobalt, manganese and other metals deeper on the ocean floor, but concerned about barriers to dig in Neptune’s kingdom.

TTR aims to raise as much as US$550 million in debt and equity to fund the project, expected to begin production by 2016.

ttl-project-map nz image www.www-globalcommodities.com

Kiwis Against Seabed Mining (KASM) led opposition to the initiative, claiming there was too much scientific uncertainty about environmental impacts of the proposal, as well potential effects on surf breaks and other coastal formations.

TTR argues the iron sands are mainly inhabited by sandworms, which typically re-establish themselves after disturbance over a period of years.

“Our view, supported by our science experts, is that between five and 10 years you will get almost full recovery of the area that’s been mined … because the organisms and environment are already quite adapted and recover quickly,” TTR Chief Executive Tim Crossley told Reuters.

Trans Tasman Resources already has a mining licence, but is awaiting a marine consent from New Zealand’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Trans Tasman Resources already has a mining licence, but is awaiting a marine consent from New Zealand’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Nautilus Minerals (TSX:NUS), the first company that began exploring the ocean floor for polymetallic massive sulphide deposits, reached an agreement with Papua New Guinea in April. The deal will allow Nautilus’ Solwara 1 gold, copper and silver underwater project, located in the Bismarck Sea, north of Papua New Guinea, to finally move towards production.

The Canadian company, which is also in talks with New Zealand, expects to begin production at Solwara in 2017.

The push to explore the ocean for mining minerals is gaining momentum as ore deposits on land are on the decline, and demand for hard-to-find rare-earth elements needed for portable electronics and batteries for hybrid vehicles continues to grow.

Henry Sapiecha

**** LATEST NEWS RELEASE ON UNDERWATER MINING IN NEW ZEALAND****

Authorities in New Zealand have poured cold water on Trans Tasman Resources (TTR) $70 million ocean floor iron mine project by rejecting what could have become the country’s first operation of its kind.

In its decision the country’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said the major for the refusal was the vagueness around the scope and significance of the potential adverse environmental effects, and those on existing interests.

The company had applied for a permit to mine 66 square kilometres, located between 22 and 36 kilometres offshore in the South Taranaki Blight.

Up to 50 million tonnes of sand per year would have bee processed on ships to remove iron ore, with about 45 million tonnes of waste sand returned to the seabed.

The committee said it wasn’t satisfied that negative effects could be avoided, remedied or mitigated. It also said it was concerned by the “lack of clarity” about the project’s wider economic benefits, outside of royalties and taxes

The committee said it wasn’t satisfied that negative effects could be avoided, remedied or mitigated. It also said it was concerned by the “lack of clarity” about the project’s wider economic benefits, outside of royalties and taxes. The company now has 15 days to appeal with the High Court.

TTR had estimated it would extract about $446 million worth of iron each year, providing employment opportunities and raising the level of New Zealand’s exports by $147 million per year.

Considering next steps

In an e-mailed statement, Trans-Tasman Resources chief executive Tim Crossley said his firm was extremely disappointed with the decision.

“We have put a significant amount of time and effort into developing this project including consulting with iwi and local communities and undertaking detailed scientific research to assess environmental impacts of the project,” he said.

The company, which has already spent more than $50 million on the project, will take the next few days to consider next steps.

The push to explore the ocean for mining minerals is gaining momentum as ore deposits on land are on the decline, and demand for hard-to-find rare-earth elements needed for portable electronics and batteries for hybrid vehicles continues to grow.

Besides New Zealand and Papua New Guinea, where Canadian Nautilus Minerals (TSX:NUS) is developing its Solwara 1 gold, copper and silver project, other countries in the Pacific are also looking at underwater mining. Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu, have all issued exploration licenses. Cook Islands, in the South Pacific, also plans to put seabed exploration permits up for bids later this year.

Henry Sapiecha

ASTEROID MINING WILL FOCUS ON FINDING WATER FIRST

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

ASTEROID MINING FOR WATER & MINERALS IS TO HAPPEN

SPACE FOR SALE SIGN PICTURE

Profiting from the riches that asteroids, stars and even planets have to offer is closer than ever, with two companies launching missions within three years. But experts say before going for the gold, platinum and diamonds that may be up there, they need to find the most precious of all: water.

Investors eager to get the new industry off the ground know this. That is why new ventures that have backing from some loaded business figures, and even the NASA, have decided to focus on using space minerals in interplanetary “gas stations.” According to Reuters, the other alternative for them is to build, support and fuel colonies on Mars.

Geologists believe that asteroids hold iron ore, nickel and precious metals at much higher concentrations than those found on Earth. In fact, an asteroid that flew by the earth earlier this year had an estimated value of $195 billion in metal and fuel.

Scientists have said asteroid mining is a necessity as many metals that underpin our modern economy are quickly being depleted. Without any new technological advances, metals like zinc and gold are expected to run out in 100 years, they claim.

So far there are at least two asteroid mining companies —Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries —and the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)looking into the feasibility of the extraterrestrial endeavour.

Not a competition

Experts say that while viable, asteroid mining is not and will probably never be a completion for our planet’s industry. The real value in space mineral extraction, they say, is for further space travel – and so hydrogen and oxygen reserves are as attractive as any metal.

“It’s ridiculous to believe that asteroid resources will ever compete with terrestrial alternatives and Earth markets,” Brad Blair, a mining engineer and economist, told Reuters.

When asked about the planned city-sized settlements on Mars, he noted the reason asteroid mining makes sense is because people might be some day where those resources actually are.

“You can’t put an 80,000-person colony on Mars without using the local ‘timber’ (…) and if you’re going to use chemical propulsion, it’s going to take a lot of water to get them there,” he was quoted as saying.

No everyone shares his opinion, in March this year the head of the Canadian Space Commerce Association (CSCA), Arny Sokoloff, said he had “no doubts” that space mining will go farther than earth mining one day. He added governments should encourage the industry by offering tax benefits similar to those given to mining companies

AAA

Henry Sapiecha

fine gold line

MINING WATER TREATMENTS VIDEO EXPLAINS DO'S & DONT'S

Sunday, November 27th, 2011

The protection of water resources is essential to mining operations. Process water is generated through plant operations. Process water can be managed through closed-loop process water settling ponds. Stormwater should be directed away from process water. If it comes in contact with process water it must be treated as process water. Regular inspections will ensure that your water controls are working properly. A spill and leak countermeasure control plan must be drawn up and kept onsite. Petroleum products should be properly protected and stored. The plant is responsible for any onsite spill regardless of the source. Author: Maryland Center for Environmental Training / College of Southern Maryland Publication Date: 2000 http://www.p2ric.org/video/index.cfm

http://video.mining.com/?v=1165

Sourced & posted by Henry Sapiecha

WATER AND ITS USES IN THE MINING INDUSTRY

Friday, May 27th, 2011

WATER IN THE MINING INDUSTRY

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

MORE ON WATER >>> www.h20-water.com

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