Archive for the ‘URANIUM PLUTONIUM’ Category

China claims to hold over 2 million tonnes of uranium deposits

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

China claims to hold over 2 million tonnes of uranium deposits

Chinese authorities have unveiled the results of study into the nation’s uranium deposits, which puts its reserves at over 2 million tonnes, government’s Xinhua News Agency reports.

According to the head of China Nuclear geology (CNG), Du Yunbin, the country’s uranium deposits have doubled in the last 15 years to more than 350 across the nation.

The news come as China continues to expand its nuclear program, officially resuming construction of new plants after a 15-months hiatus, beginning with the fifth unit at the Hongyanhe nuclear plant in Liaoning.

With the move, Beijing intends to become self-sufficient not just in nuclear power plant capacity, but also in the production of fuel for those plants.

Domestic uranium mining currently supplies less than a quarter of China’s nuclear fuel needs, according to data from The World Nuclear Association. Exploration and plans for new mines have increased significantly since 2000, and state-owned firms are also acquiring uranium resources internationally.

To boost discoveries, the nation has created a multi-dimensional search system for uranium mines, which includes space remote sensing as well as airborne, ground-based and deep-mining exploration, the official said.

Supporting new projects will be critical to China achieving its 2020 target of 58 gigawatts of installed nuclear capacity by 2020, up from about 20 gigawatts today. The government wants to raise the role of nuclear-power production in China’s energy mix, part of an effort to draw down reliance on polluting coal.

China is the world’s largest nuclear growth market. The country operates 24 reactors currently and a further 25 are under construction, out of 68 globally, according to the IAEA.

While Beijing doesn’t disclose total spending, estimates based on the cost of reactors show the country is investing tens of billions of dollars in potential new business for Chinese and foreign companies over the coming decade

OOO

Henry Sapiecha

Chinese company on the verge of starting to mine uranium in Namibia

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Chinese firm close to start mining uranium in Namibia

China General Nuclear Power Holding Corp (CGNPC), the country’s biggest producer of nuclear energy, is getting ready to begin mining for uranium at its Husab mine, located in western-central Namibia.

According to African Review, the clean energy corporation intends to start processing the ore in February 2016, with operations slated to begin later this year.

CGNPC, which acquired the mine after taking control of Kalahari Minerals and Extract Resources, has spent over US$2bn in the project since work began in 2012, which makes it China’s largest investment in the African nation so far.

Once fully operational, Husab mine will have the potential to produce 15 million pounds of uranium oxide.

Once fully operational, Husab mine will have the potential to produce 15 million pounds of uranium oxide.

Canada’s Cameco Corp (TSX:CCO), the country’s biggest uranium producer, has been signalled in the past as potential buyer for offtake output from the project, located 8 kilometers (5 miles) south of Rio Tinto Group’s Z20 deposit in the Namib-Naukluft national park.

Uranium mineralization was first discovered in the Namibia’s Rossing Mountains, Namib Desert, in 1928 by Capt. G. Peter Louw. Uranium exploration official started in 1960s with Rio Tinto obtaining exploration rights for the Rössing deposit in 1966. It started production in 1976.

The Rössing mine is currently Namibia’s longest running and one of the world’s largest open pit uranium mines.

Image courtesy of Swakop Uranium.

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Henry Sapiecha

On The Bench: The Rush from Uranium? [VIDEO]

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

On The Bench: The Rush from Uranium? [VIDEO]

In a new segment for Australian Mining, Editor Cole Latimer and Journalist Vicky Validakis sit down to discuss commodities, the mining industry and breaking news in resources across the globe.

This week we discuss QLD’s looming uranium mining ban and what it means for the industry.

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

Uranium on the rise as Asia renews it’s appetite for nuclear energy

Saturday, December 20th, 2014

uranium-picks-up-on-asias-renewed-appetite-for-nuclear-energy image www.www-globalcommodities.com

Since bottoming out at US$28 a pound in May, uranium prices have climbed 35%, becoming the one commodity that seems to be resisting the broad selloff.

prices are still far from the point that would allow mining activity to pick up again

The surge, analysts agree, is due mostly to China’s increased reliance on nuclear energy and renewable energy sources as it moves away from coal-fired plants. But prices are still far from the point that would allow mining activity to pick up again, they warn.

“There’s some movement but I don’t think uranium prices are going to break out of the stalls in near-time,” says Matthew Keane, mining analyst with Argonaut in Perth Australia told Financial Times (subs. required).

“Everyone agrees that today’s prices are too low because you are not incentivizing new supply. The big question is when will prices move higher because there are still significant inventories around since Fukushima,” said John Ellis, investment manager at APAC Resources, told The Wall Street Journal.

Japan and China lead

The market got a big shot in the arm in early November after Japan announced it was finally ready to restart two of its 48 idled reactors, halted since the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011. The move sparked hope of Japan being able to put four more units back online next year. Nuclear power comprised 30% of the country’s power mix before the Fukushima disaster and the country has relied largely on imported gas and coal for power since then, WSJ reports.

uranium-prices-index-mundi chart image www.www-globalcommodities.com

nuclear power plants are also being built in the U.S., United Arab Emirates, South Korea and Europe.

Apart from moving away from coal, China is also building as many as 29 nuclear reactors. And nuclear power plants are also being built in the U.S., United Arab Emirates, South Korea and Europe.

But signs of recovery in the sector emerged even before all these, as utilities jumped into the market and bought more uranium. As a result, sellers have been less desperate and are pushing for higher prices.

Shares in uranium miners have not performed as well as the spot price, however. According to Global X Uranium ETF companies focus on the commodity have lost about 25% of their value this year.

large loan application banners image www.money-au (9)

Henry Sapiecha

URANIUM MINE MULTI BILLION DOLLAR DEAL IN AFRICA BY CHINA GOES AHEAD IN THE ERONGA REGION

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013
Construction of Husab Uranium mine begins
19 Apr 2013 – Story by Eveline de Klerk

SWAKOMUND – Yesterday’s groundbreaking ceremony for the first phase of the construction of the Swakop Uranium Husab mine in the Erongo Region heralded Namibia’s first direct participation in the mining extraction industry.

Construction of the Husab mine, at an estimated cost of about N$1.2 billion, is expected to extend until 2014 for the mine to produce its first batch of uranium ore by 2015. The mine, situated 60 kilometres northeast of Swakopmund, is said to house uranium reserves of at least 280 million tonnes that could be mined for more than 20 years.

Full production is expected by 2017, with mining from two separate open pits feeding ore to a conventional agitated acid leach processing plant. Government has a 10 percent direct shareholding in the mine, along with the majority shareholder, the Chinese state-owned Guandong Nuclear Power Company Uranium Resources, which bought the mining interest from the Australian-listed mining firm Extract last year for nearly N$19 billion.

Wild Secrets

Namibia’s shareholding is vested in State mining company, Epangelo Mining, which bought the 10 percent equity in Swakop Uranium for over N$1.8 billion. “Not only will the government benefit from this partnership.  Many local companies would directly benefit from the mine through service delivery. This government is committed to the sustainable utilization of the country’s natural resources to benefit Namibians and is encouraging win-win partnerships between Namibians and foreign investors,” Minister of Mines and Energy Isaak Katali said during the groundbreaking ceremony at the construction site.

Once on stream the mine is expected to boost employment in the mining sector by at least 17 percent and increase the country’s Gross Domestic Product by at least 5 percent. The export of ‘yellow cake’ is expected to increase the country’s total exports by 20 percent. The Husab mine deposits are regarded as the most important uranium discovery in recent years, since the mine is anticipated to have a potential of producing up to 15.5 million pounds of uranium per annum.

The figure is more than Namibia’s total annual production and will push the country past Niger, Australia and Canada to become the world’s second largest uranium producer. The 8 kilometre mineralisation has been confirmed as the highest grade, granite-hosted uranium deposit in Namibia. Furthermore, the mine will create 2 000 permanent jobs, 6 000 temporary jobs and at least 8 000 indirect jobs during the construction phase. Katali said the mining industry is one of the securest pillars of the country’s economy and generates   billions in royalties and taxes for the government.

Katali urged all mining companies to comply and operate within the laws and regulations of the country. “I am aware that an environmental assessment impact was approved by the ministry of environment and tourism as the mining will be conducted in a protect area. By complying with the relevant laws and regulations at all stages will avoid damaging of the environment and our fragile eco-system…,” Katali said.

Chinese Charge d’affaires Li Yigang said the Husab mine is committed to social and empowerment aspects such as job creation and local recruitment. “Swakop Uranium attaches great importance to its goal of localisation in Namibia and is committed to create a fair and competitive bidding environment for technically capable vendors from both Namibia and abroad,” he said.

Henry Sapiecha

 

AUSTRALIAS MINERAL WEALTH LOCATIONS HERE

Friday, July 30th, 2010

PROFILE OF MAJOR MINERALS, OIL AND GAS

This section is based on information contributed by Geoscience Australia and the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) (September 2006).

Note: Values are given in Australian currency unless otherwise stated.

MINERALS

Maps 16.23, 16.24 and 16.25 show selected mines and deposits – map 16.23 covers gold and diamonds; map 16.24 covers bauxite, coal, iron ore, manganese ore and uranium; map 16.25 covers base metals and mineral sands.

16.23 SELECTED MINES AND DEPOSITS OF GOLD AND DIAMONDS – 2005
16.23   SELECTED=
16.24 SELECTED MINES AND DEPOSITS OF BAUXITE, COAL, IRON ORE, MANGANESE AND URANIUM – 2005
16.24 SELECTED=
16.25 SELECTED MINES AND DEPOSITS OF BASE METALS AND MINERAL SANDS – 2005

16.25 SELECTED=

Bauxite, alumina and aluminium

Bauxite is a heterogeneous naturally occurring material from which alumina and aluminium are produced. The principal minerals in bauxite are gibbsite, boehmite and diaspore (which has the same composition as boehmite but is denser and harder). Bauxite is the ore from which alumina (aluminium oxide) is extracted while aluminium is produced from smelting alumina.

Australia’s aluminium industry is a large integrated industry of mining, refining, smelting and semi-fabrication, which is of major economic importance nationally and globally. Its EDR of bauxite (5.8 gigatonnes (Gt)) provide a world class resource base for the industry, which comprises five bauxite mines, seven alumina refineries, six primary aluminium smelters, twelve extrusion and two rolled product (sheet, plate and foil) mills. In 2005 Australia was the largest producer of bauxite and alumina. The Australian aluminium industry directly employs over 12,000 people.

Production in 2005 totalled 60.0 Mt of bauxite, 17.7 Mt of alumina and 1.9 Mt of aluminium (ingot metal). Compared with 2004 these represented an increase of 6.0% for bauxite, 7.3% for alumina and no change for aluminium.

In 2005, the Queensland Government called for expressions of interest in the development of the Aurukun Bauxite Project. The objectives for the development of the Aurukun resource include its development as a source of bauxite for a new alumina refinery in Queensland. The $US1.3b expansion plans for the Gove alumina refinery in the Northern Territory are progressing. The project is scheduled to be completed by 2007 and will lift the refinery’s capacity from 2.1 Mt to around 3.8 Mt per year.

Coal

Black coal is a solid rock formed from brown coal after greater heat and pressure have been applied. Black coals are distinguished by rank and may be sub-bituminous, bituminous or anthracite. Black coal is primarily used for electricity generation and the production of coke, which is integral to the production of iron and steel. Black coal is also used as a source of heat in the manufacture of cement and food processing. Brown coal is a less matured form of coal. It has a high ‘in situ’ moisture content (up to 60%) with a correspondingly low heating value. It is highly susceptible to spontaneous combustion. Brown coal is used widely for power generation, is made into briquettes, and can be converted to liquid or gaseous fuels.

Although coal mining occurred in all states in 2005, New South Wales and Queensland produced over 96% of all black coal (anthracite, bituminous and sub-bituminous coals) and Victoria produced all the brown coal (lignite). Australia’s EDR of recoverable black coal is 39.2 Gt, which is about 5% of total world EDR making Australia’s holdings the sixth largest in the world. EDR of recoverable brown coal is 37.4 Gt, which gives Australia the largest holding in the world and accounts for 24% of world EDR. All EDR is located in Victoria and about 89% is located in the La Trobe Valley.

Australia’s coal production and exports have risen strongly over the last two decades. Production of black coal increased in 2005. Output of saleable black coal at 303.0 Mt was 1.7% higher than in 2004 and made Australia the world’s fourth largest producer. Brown coal production reached 67.2 Mt in 2004-05. Australia was the world’s fifth largest producer of brown coal with about 8% of production.

Copper

Copper occurs in various forms. It can occur naturally in its pure state (native copper) but is principally mined as chalcopyrite. Copper is one of the most important and widely used metals of modern society due to its properties of:

  • high electrical and heat conductivity
  • ductile and malleable
  • resistant to corrosion
  • ability to form alloys with other metals.

These properties enable copper to be used in a wide range of applications. The largest use of copper is in the electrical industry where copper wire and cable account for about half of the world’s copper production. Other major markets are the motor vehicle and construction sectors. Copper is also an integral part of the expanding information technology sector and is used in the manufacture of computers, mobile phones, fax machines and televisions.

Major Australian copper mining and smelting operations are at Olympic Dam (South Australia) and Mt Isa (Queensland), with smaller projects in New South Wales, Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania. Australia’s EDR of copper is 41.4 Mt giving it the world’s second largest holding of copper EDR with 8% of the total.

Mine production of copper in 2005 was 921 kt of contained copper, 7% higher than in 2004 (860 kt). Queensland dominates Australian production with 399 kt (largely from Mt Isa) followed by South Australia with 213 kt (all from Olympic Dam). The remaining production occurred in New South Wales (190 kt), Western Australia (90 kt) and Tasmania (30 kt). As a producer, Australia ranks fifth, with 6% of world output, after Chile (36%), the United States of America (8%) and Indonesia and Peru (both 7%).

Diamond

Diamond is composed of carbon, and is the hardest known natural substance, but a sharp blow can shatter it. Diamonds occur naturally but are extremely rare compared with other minerals. Diamonds are thought to form deep in the earth at high temperatures and pressures and are carried to the surface or near surface by volcanic rocks in narrow cylinder-like bodies called ‘pipes’. A large proportion of industrial diamonds are manufactured, and it is also possible to produce synthetic diamonds of gem quality. Uses for diamond include jewellery, computer chip manufacture, drill bit facing, and stone cutting and polishing.

Australia produced 30.7 million carats (Mc) of diamond in 2005, making it the world’s second largest producer of diamond by weight after Russia, with Botswana and Congo (Kinshasa) ranked third and fourth respectively. It is the second largest producer of industrial-grade diamond and the third largest producer of gem/near gem diamond after Botswana and Russia.

Australia’s EDR of gem/near gem diamonds is 124.2 Mc and industrial diamonds 129.2 Mc. These are both more than double the EDRs for 2004 as a result of the decision to proceed with underground mining at Argyle and a related upgrade of around half of the mineral resource to ore reserves based on the results of a comprehensive feasibility study. Australia’s EDR of industrial diamond is ranked third in the world, with 21% of world EDR.

The majority of Australian production was from the Argyle mine in the Kimberley region of Western Australia which produced 30.5 Mc of mostly industrial and near gem diamonds in 2005. Argyle production was 48% higher than in 2004 despite mining constraints within the deepening open pit.

Gold

Gold has a range of uses but the two principal applications are as an investment instrument and in the manufacture of jewellery. Secondary uses, in terms of the amount of gold consumed, are in electronic and dental applications.

Gold resources occur and are mined in all Australian states and the Northern Territory. Australia’s EDR of gold is 5,225 tonnes, the second largest in the world after South Africa.

Australian gold production in 2005 (reported by ABARE) was 263 tonnes. This level of production makes Australia the second largest producer in the world after South Africa. The Super Pit at Kalgoorlie in Western Australia was the largest producer with an output of nearly 26 tonnes (just over 0.8 million ounces).

Iron ore

Iron ore is the source of primary iron for the world’s steel industries. Over 97% of iron ore production occurs in the Hamersley Basin (Western Australia). Small production also comes from elsewhere in Western Australia, Tasmania, South Australia and New South Wales. Australia’s EDR of iron ore is 16.4 Gt which is about 10% of world EDR. Western Australia has almost all of Australia’s EDR with about 92% occurring in the Pilbara district. Australia has the fifth largest iron ore holding in the world.

Australia’s production of iron ore in 2005 (reported by ABARE) was 261.4 Mt, which was 17% of world output, making Australia the world’s third largest producer after China and Brazil.

Manganese ore

About 90% of the world’s production of manganese is used in the desulphurisation and strengthening of steel. Other uses include the manufacture of dry batteries, as a colorant, and as an ingredient in plant fertilisers and animal feed. Manganese ore was mined in the Northern Territory and Western Australia in 2005. Production reached 3.9 Mt, 14% of world output, making Australia the third largest producer in the world. Australian production is from three mines – Woodie Woodie (Western Australia) and Groote Eylandt and Bootu Creek (both in the Northern Territory). Australia’s EDR of manganese ore, at 143 Mt, is 12% of world EDR, fourth largest in the world.

Mineral sands

The three main minerals mined from Australian mineral sands deposits are the titanium-bearing minerals rutile and ilmenite and the zirconium-bearing mineral zircon. Rutile and ilmenite are used mainly in the production of titanium dioxide pigment. A small portion, less than 4% of total titanium mineral production and typically rutile, is used in making titanium sponge metal. Zircon is used as an opacifier for glazes on ceramic tiles, and is used in refractories and the foundry industry. Production in 2005 was from Western Australia, Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales.

Australia’s EDR of ilmenite is 214.9 Mt of which 59% is in Western Australia, 25% in Queensland and the rest in New South Wales (7%), Victoria (6%) and South Australia (3%). Australia accounts for 19% (the second largest holding behind China at 35%) of the world’s EDR of ilmenite. Queensland, New South Wales, Western Australia and Victoria together hold over 97% of Australia’s 20.5 Mt EDR of rutile, which, at 40% of world EDR, is the world’s largest.

EDR of zircon is 32.9 Mt, with Western Australia and Queensland holding just over 68%. In world terms, Australia’s EDR is 43% of the total and is the largest holding by any country.

Although Australia has substantial EDR of mineral sands, Geoscience Australia estimates that some 17% of ilmenite, 28% of rutile and 25% of zircon EDR is unavailable for mining. They are in areas quarantined from mining that are largely incorporated into national parks. Deposits in this category include Moreton Island, Bribie Island and Fraser Island, Cooloola sand mass, Byfield sand mass and Shoalwater Bay area (Queensland) and Yuraygir, Bundjalung, Hat Head and Myall Lakes National Parks (New South Wales).

In 2005 Australia produced 2.03 Mt of ilmenite, 177,000 tonnes of rutile, 55,000 tonnes of leucoxene and 426,000 tonnes of zircon. The bulk of Australia’s rutile and zircon production is exported compared with about 35% for ilmenite. The remaining ilmenite is upgraded to synthetic rutile. Australia was the world’s largest producer of ilmenite, rutile and zircon (with 23%, 47% and 40% of world output respectively) in 2005.

Nickel

Australia’s EDR of nickel increased by 6% to 23.9 Mt in 2005. Western Australia has the largest nickel resources, with over 90% of total Australian EDR. Australia holds the largest share of the world’s EDR, with 37%.

Australian mine production of nickel in 2005 increased by 1% to 189,000 tonnes, all from Western Australia. The value of all nickel products exported was $3.5b. Australia was the world’s third largest producer, accounting for 13% of estimated world nickel output.

Tantalum

Australia is the world’s largest producer of tantalum in the form of tantalum concentrates. Australia also has the world’s largest stock of tantalum resources, principally in its deposits at Greenbushes and Wodgina in Western Australia.

Australia has the world’s largest EDR of tantalum at 52,000 tonnes. This is approximately 95% of world EDR.

Uranium

Australia has 716,000 tonnes of uranium in Reasonably Assured Resources recoverable at costs of less than US$40/kilogram of uranium – this is the world’s largest resource and represents 37% of world resources in this category (OECD Nuclear Energy Agency & International Atomic Energy Agency, 2005). Almost all of Australia’s total resources are in six deposits:

  • Olympic Dam (South Australia) which is the world’s largest uranium deposit
  • Ranger, Jabiluka and Koongarra in the Alligator River region (Northern Territory)
  • Kintyre and Yeelirrie (Western Australia).

Three uranium mines operated in 2005 – Ranger open cut, Olympic Dam underground mine, and the Beverley (South Australia) in situ leach operations. In 2005 Ranger produced 5,906 tonnes of uranium oxide, Olympic Dam 4,335 tonnes and Beverley 977 tonnes for a total of 11,218 tonnes, 6% higher than for 2004. Australia, with approximately 23% of world uranium production in 2005, is the world’s second largest producer after Canada (28%). While there are a number of undeveloped deposits in Western Australia, Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland, uranium mining is only allowed to occur in the current three mines in the Northern Territory and South Australia.

Exports of uranium oxide in 2005 were a record 12,360 tonnes, valued at $573m. Exports are controlled by Australian Government bilateral safeguards agreements, which are designed to ensure that Australia’s uranium is used only for electricity generation and is not diverted to any military purposes. Importing countries must be signatories to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s safeguards arrangements and have entered into an agreement with the Australian Government to adhere to safeguard obligations for exporting uranium.

Australian mining companies supply uranium under long-term contracts to electricity utilities in the United States of America, Japan, European Union (United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Belgium and Finland), Republic of (South) Korea and Canada.

Zinc, lead, silver

Zinc is the 23rd most abundant element in the earth’s crust. The construction, appliance and vehicle manufacturing industries use large amounts of zinc, mainly as coatings on steel beams, sheet steel and vehicle panels in the automotive industry.

The widespread occurrence, relatively simple extraction, and combination of desirable properties have made lead useful to humans since at least 5000 BC. In deposits mined today, lead (in the form of galena) is usually associated with zinc, silver and sometimes copper, and is extracted as a co-product of these metals. More than half of the lead used comes from recycling, rather than mining. The largest use is in batteries for vehicles and communications.

The relative scarcity, attractive appearance and malleability of silver has made it suitable for use in jewellery, ornaments and silverware. Its extensive use in coins throughout history has declined over the past 40 years. In Australia, the 1966 fifty-cent piece was the last coin in general use to contain silver (80% silver, 20% copper). Silver is mined and produced mainly as a co-product of copper, lead, zinc, and to a lesser extent, gold. Today, photographic paper and film, followed by the electronics and jewellery/tableware industries are the most important users of silver.

Australian EDR of zinc is close to 42 Mt, with Queensland holding 62%. The Northern Territory, New South Wales, Western Australia and Tasmania also have zinc EDR.

Australia’s EDR of 23.8 Mt of lead is 32% of world EDR. Queensland has 60% of total Australian EDR. Other holdings are in the Northern Territory, New South Wales, Western Australia and Tasmania.

EDR for silver in 2005 was 44 Kt, with Queensland having the largest share at 67.5%. Other holdings occur in South Australia (12.5%), Northern Territory (11.3%), New South Wales (5.0%), and Western Australia (2.5%) with the remainder in Tasmania and Victoria.

Australia has the world’s largest EDR of zinc (18% of the world) and lead (32%), and the second largest EDR of silver (16%).

Mine production of zinc, lead and silver in 2005 was 1.37 Mt, 767,000 tonnes and 2,407 tonnes respectively. Production was higher for each commodity compared with 2004, with zinc up 33,000 tonnes, lead up 90,000 tonnes and silver up 170 tonnes. In production, Australia ranks second for lead and zinc after China and fourth for silver after Peru, Mexico and China. Cannington (Queensland) is the world’s largest and lowest cost silver and lead operation and produced almost 288,000 tonnes of lead and 43.9 million ounces of silver in 2005. Century (Queensland) had the largest zinc output at 501,000 tonnes.

OIL AND GAS

Map 16.26 shows significant locations of oil and gas production and includes oil and gas production locations, oil and gas pipelines and oil refineries.

16.26 LOCATIONS OF OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION AND PIPELINES – 2005
16.26   LOCATIONS OF OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION AND PIPELINES - 2005

Crude oil and condensate

In 2005-06 production of total crude oil and condensate from the North West Shelf (off Western Australia) and the Gippsland Basin (Victoria) accounted for 41% and 19% respectively of total Australian crude oil and condensate production. The North West Shelf was the major producer of condensate during 2005-06 with 79% of total Australian production sourced from that region.

Liquefied natural gas (LNG)

LNG production has in previous years been solely from the North West Shelf Venture but in February 2006 production commenced from the LNG plant in Darwin (Northern Territory). Australian LNG production in 2005-06 was 12.38 Mt. Export earnings from LNG in 2005-06 were $4.4b, an increase of $1.2b on 2004-05.

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)

LPG is a valuable co-product of oil and gas production and petroleum refining. The major constituents of LPG are propane and iso and normal-butane, which are gaseous at normal temperatures and pressures, and are easily liquefied at moderate pressures or reduced temperatures. Operations involving LPG are expensive in relation to other liquid fuels because LPG has to be refrigerated or pressurised when transported and stored. LPG is an alternative transport fuel for high mileage vehicles in urban areas, as well as a petrochemical feedstock and domestic fuel.

In 2005-06 the major producers were the Gippsland Basin and the North West Shelf accounting for 41% and 46% of total production respectively.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

CHINESE TAKEOVER OF AUSSIE RESOURCES PLANNED

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

Chinese likely to be circling

Aussie targets

KATE EMERY, The West Australian June 1, 2010, 7:21 am

Paladin Energy is a company likely to be on China's radar because its biggest assets are overseas. Pictured is the company's Langer Heinrich uranium project in Namibia.NO COPYRIGHT / Paladin Energy ©

A sinking Australian dollar, global equity jitters and a surge in Chinese foreign reserves have put Australian acquisitions back on China’s agenda, analysts say.

Paladin Energy, PanAust and Aquarius Platinum top the list of takeover targets, according to Citigroup analysts. They say miners with offshore assets will be sought after because those with local projects could be hurt by the resource super profits tax and or adverse Foreign Investment Review Board rulings.

“Just as the GFC gave China an opportunity to bid for mining assets with little competition, we expect the global risk reduction sell-off and collapse in the Australian dollar to once again provide an opportunity,” Citi analysts said in a note to clients.

The Citi report echoes industry speculation that the proposed tax could hand Chinese interests a greater slice of Australian resources as other sources of funding dry up.

Chinese foreign exchange reserves surged to $US2.4 trillion in March, up 25 per cent year-on-year. On Citi’s numbers, it is estimated about 70 per cent of that is in US dollars, with the balance mostly in euros and Japanese yen.

The Australian dollar has fallen more than 9 per cent from this year’s high of US93.51¢. It closed yesterday at US84.78¢, down from Friday’s close of US85.09¢.

Paladin, PanAust and Aquarius were named at Citi’s top targets because they all own overseas assets, have no major potential blocking shareholder and are mining commodities that China is expected to be seeking: uranium, copper and platinum respectively.
Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

URANIUM STAKE IN AUSTRALIAN MINE SOLD

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

Uranium One sells Paladin stake

KATE EMERY, The West Australian June 9, 2010, 9:21 am

Paladin Energy's Namibian operation.NO COPYRIGHT / Paladin Energy ©

Just over a month after Uranium One emerged on the register of Paladin Energy, prompting takeover speculation, the Russian-controlled miner has sold its 3 per cent stake.

In a statement today Paladin said it “welcomed” the news that Uranium One had sold its recently-acquired stake.

The Toronto Stock Exchange-listed Uranium One made the announcement overnight.

“Importantly this leaves Paladin as the only fully independent, publicly listed pure uranium producer in the world,” Paladin said in a statement.

Paladin revealed that Uranium One was building a stake in the miner early last month, sparking speculation it could have the African-focused miner in the crosshairs.

Shares in Paladin were 2¢ lower to $3.75 by 9.20am.

Paladin has long been regarded as a takeover target because it is one of the few mid-tier uranium producers in the world.
Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha
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