Archive for the ‘AIR GAS NOISE’ Category

NEW ZEALND IS DRIPPING WITH OIL & GAS IT IS SAID

Monday, January 16th, 2012

THE COUNTRY OF NEW ZEALAND EAST COAST LEAKING WITH OIL & GAS

The East Coast basin is “literally leaking oil and gas” and provides potential for thousands of wells, an oil company with exploration permits in the area says.

New Zealand’s main oil and gas producing region is at Taranaki on the west coast of the North Island but Tag Oil says the East Coast basin on the other side of the North Island has “world class upside potential”.

A presentation by the small Canadian-based company on its website says it has identified widespread oil and gas seeps over a large area.

The presentation says the “East Coast basin is literally leaking oil and gas”.

The Sunday Star Times newspaper reported that the company regarded the East Coast as a “Texas of the south” and wanted to pursue an aggressive program there.

Last September the company said it was undertaking seismic testing in the region, with first exploration drilling planned after that. The region is seen as having potential for so-called shale oil extracted from rock.

The company has a farmout deal with Apache for the region, under which Apache may spend up to $US100 million ($A97 million) to earn up to half of Tag’s present 100 per cent share of exploration prospects.

“This is not where New Zealand’s economic future lies. We need to be investing instead in renewable solutions,” says Moana Mackey, Labour’s Energy representative.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

AIR & NOISE POLLUTION INFO IN MINING VIDEO

Sunday, November 27th, 2011

Air and noise pollution are two major concerns that communities have about neighboring mining operations. Governmental regulations are in place to limit the amount of air emissions allowed in the mining industry. Two types of air emissions must be controlled, point-source and fugitive emissions. Wet-suppression, Bag-house filtration, or enclosures can reduce point-source dust emissions. Wetting aggregate pile during loading, wetting roadways and controlling the speed limit of vehicles will reduce fugitive emissions. Blasting creates short term dust emissions and ground vibrations. Acceptable blasting times and vibration limits must be adhered to in order to minimize community complains. Enclosures will also reduce the amount of noise pollution emitting from the plant. Shrubs and trees will act as a buffer zone between operational noise and the community. Author: Maryland Center for Environmental Training / College of Southern Maryland Publication D

http://video.mining.com/?v=1164

Sourced & posted by Henry Sapiecha


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