Archive for the ‘AEROSPACE’ Category

ASTEROID MINING WILL FOCUS ON FINDING WATER FIRST

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

ASTEROID MINING FOR WATER & MINERALS IS TO HAPPEN

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Profiting from the riches that asteroids, stars and even planets have to offer is closer than ever, with two companies launching missions within three years. But experts say before going for the gold, platinum and diamonds that may be up there, they need to find the most precious of all: water.

Investors eager to get the new industry off the ground know this. That is why new ventures that have backing from some loaded business figures, and even the NASA, have decided to focus on using space minerals in interplanetary “gas stations.” According to Reuters, the other alternative for them is to build, support and fuel colonies on Mars.

Geologists believe that asteroids hold iron ore, nickel and precious metals at much higher concentrations than those found on Earth. In fact, an asteroid that flew by the earth earlier this year had an estimated value of $195 billion in metal and fuel.

Scientists have said asteroid mining is a necessity as many metals that underpin our modern economy are quickly being depleted. Without any new technological advances, metals like zinc and gold are expected to run out in 100 years, they claim.

So far there are at least two asteroid mining companies —Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries —and the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)looking into the feasibility of the extraterrestrial endeavour.

Not a competition

Experts say that while viable, asteroid mining is not and will probably never be a completion for our planet’s industry. The real value in space mineral extraction, they say, is for further space travel – and so hydrogen and oxygen reserves are as attractive as any metal.

“It’s ridiculous to believe that asteroid resources will ever compete with terrestrial alternatives and Earth markets,” Brad Blair, a mining engineer and economist, told Reuters.

When asked about the planned city-sized settlements on Mars, he noted the reason asteroid mining makes sense is because people might be some day where those resources actually are.

“You can’t put an 80,000-person colony on Mars without using the local ‘timber’ (…) and if you’re going to use chemical propulsion, it’s going to take a lot of water to get them there,” he was quoted as saying.

No everyone shares his opinion, in March this year the head of the Canadian Space Commerce Association (CSCA), Arny Sokoloff, said he had “no doubts” that space mining will go farther than earth mining one day. He added governments should encourage the industry by offering tax benefits similar to those given to mining companies

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Henry Sapiecha

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SPACE ASTEROID MINING MAKES SENSE SAY THE EXPERTS

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

MINING GOLD & PLATINUM IN SPACE ASTEROIDS
Planet Bid

911 Metallurgist explains why asteroid mining is needed: many metals that underpin our modern economy are quickly being depleted.

Without any new technological advances, metals like zinc and gold are expected to run out in 100 years.


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Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

NASA INVESTIGATES ASTEROIDS PRECIOUS METAL MINING

Saturday, September 29th, 2012

MINING OF PRECIOUS METALS ON ASTEROIDS POSSIBLE SAYS NASA
Gold Company


Only five months after Google’s billionaire co-founders and filmmaker James Cameron officially launched their asteroid mining focused Planetary Resources company, the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is funding a study to evaluate how viable the endeavour really is.

Artist concept of the Robotic Asteroid Prospector by Marc Cohen et al.

According to Universe Today, space architect Marc Cohen will lead the research project, with the help of two trajectory and robotics specialists and a mineral economist.

Their jointed proposal, says NASA, will look at the fundamentals of some major questions facing the asteroid mining industry, such as the most suitable kinds of spacecraft needed, as well as the technology and business model required for a space mining project.

The team will design a mission, using a robotic miner that would launch from one of the Earth-Moon Lagrange Points (EMLP) and intercept a near Earth asteroid, mine its resources on site, and then return to the EMLP to eventually ship the mined materials to Earth.

By designing a mission, the study may be able to determine whether there is a business case for asteroid mining, but Cohen himself is sceptical of finding a positive answer to that question.

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Asteroids are rich in valuable minerals. An M-type asteroid, the third most common type, just one km diameter could contain more than two billion tons of iron ore and nickel. And, notes the company, they are not very far away.

In February this year, the heads of the world’s five largest space agencies gathered in Canada to discuss interplanetary mining, particularly the viability of mining the Moon.

Several countries, including China, have already expressed an interest in mining the moon’s resources and a number of prototype machines already exist.

However, the question of who owns asteroids and other celestial bodies remains unanswered
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Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

GERMAN AVIATION GROUP CORDNER SEE BENEFITS GETTING INTO THE MINING SECTOR

Friday, August 26th, 2011

GERMAN AVIATION GROUP GETTING INTO THE MINING SECTOR

(Berlin, Germany) Following extensive research, Cordner Aviation Group (CAG) has announced it will enter the growing worldwide mining, exploration and energy market sectors, offering aircraft with conversions based on proven Bae 146 and Avro RJ platforms. These are purpose-outfitted for the mining industry’s unique requirements. According to Stewart Cordner, the company’s president, “You might say we found a golden opportunity in this often overlooked market and the initial reactions to the Surveyor and our range of design concepts–resulting from many candid conversations with prospects in the mining industry–have been totally positive.”

The Surveyors will come from CAG’s growing remarketing portfolio of BAe 146s and Avros in a range of models.  The selection process is owner-driven and the aircraft selected for conversion depends on the specific requirements, such as average number of passengers, operational locations, distances, cargo capabilities and landing/takeoff conditions.

Says Cordner, “The 146s and Avros are not strangers to mining and energy exploration and in fact have earned high marks over the years in operations worldwide. So what we are doing now is building on a proven basic platform and greatly enhancing it based on our extensive customer needs analyses and using new technologies now available to us. For example, we have identified and plan to reduce the operating weight empty (OWE) by over half a ton over the basic passenger aircraft currently in use worldwide. The benefits are significant in terms of fuel saving, increased performance and positive environmental contributions.”

He points out number factors that will make the Surveyor so attractive to mining and exploration companies: “The aircraft has all-around excellent hot and high performance, as well as outstanding short field capability. That can be nothing more than a gravel or dirt airstrip, located potentially right where the mine is located. By taking this mine/customer-centric approach, we can minimize the permanent “land take” for the airfield, which also greatly reduces the environmental impact and, naturally, provides the industry with a maximum production and logistical upside.

The aircraft, with 112 seats or less, is also approved for short runways, such asLondonCity, which means it can make very steep approaches over rough terrain typical of mine locations. And when it lands, it is quite independent with an electric internal starter system and integral air stairs and several other autonomous features.

The initial Surveyor designs include a quick-change (QC) capability. For example, from all-passengers, to passengers and a separate VIP module, to passengers and a Medevac LifePort™ separate cabin. But at the end of the day, it all depends what the customer requires for his flight operation.

Adds Cordner, who has worked with the Bae 146/Avro series over 20 years, at least half of those “hands on” in the field with customers and their operations. “These aircraft have been simply and ruggedly built originally to airline standards and for high utilization at remote locations. Considering their fuel efficiency, low acquisition and operating costs, and a 60,000-hour lifespan barely touched, they have to be the best bargains in the air. Add to that the fact that it has the lowest noise print of any similarly sized jet and meets all current emissions standards, our Surveyor is kind to the environment as well.

(Berlin, Germany) Following extensive research, Cordner Aviation Group (CAG) has announced it wiis now entering the growing worldwide mining, exploration and energy market sectors, offering aircraft with conversions based on proven Bae 146 and Avro RJ platforms. These are purpose-outfitted for the mining industry’s unique requirements. According to Stewart Cordner, the company’s president, “You might say we found a golden opportunity in this often overlooked market and the initial reactions to the Surveyor and our range of design concepts–resulting from many candid conversations with prospects in the mining industry–have been totally positive.”

The Surveyors will come from CAG’s growing remarketing portfolio of BAe 146s and Avros in a range of models.  The selection process is owner-driven and the aircraft selected for conversion depends on the specific requirements, such as average number of passengers, operational locations, distances, cargo capabilities and landing/takeoff conditions.

Says Cordner, “The 146s and Avros are not strangers to mining and energy exploration and in fact have earned high marks over the years in operations worldwide. So what we are doing now is building on a proven basic platform and greatly enhancing it based on our extensive customer needs analyses and using new technologies now available to us. For example, we have identified and plan to reduce the operating weight empty (OWE) by over half a ton over the basic passenger aircraft currently in use worldwide. The benefits are significant in terms of fuel saving, increased performance and positive environmental contributions.”

He points out number factors that will make the Surveyor so attractive to mining and exploration companies: “The aircraft has all-around excellent hot and high performance, as well as outstanding short field capability. That can be nothing more than a gravel or dirt airstrip, located potentially right where the mine is located. By taking this mine/customer-centric approach, we can minimize the permanent “land take” for the airfield, which also greatly reduces the environmental impact and, naturally, provides the industry with a maximum production and logistical upside.

The aircraft, with 112 seats or less, is also approved for short runways, such asLondonCity, which means it can make very steep approaches over rough terrain typical of mine locations. And when it lands, it is quite independent with an electric internal starter system and integral air stairs and several other autonomous features.

The initial Surveyor designs include a quick-change (QC) capability. For example, from all-passengers, to passengers and a separate VIP module, to passengers and a Medevac LifePort™ separate cabin. But at the end of the day, it all depends what the customer requires for his flight operation.

Adds Cordner, who has worked with the Bae 146/Avro series over 20 years, at least half of those “hands on” in the field with customers and their operations. “These aircraft have been simply and ruggedly built originally to airline standards and for high utilization at remote locations. Considering their fuel efficiency, low acquisition and operating costs, and a 60,000-hour lifespan barely touched, they have to be the best bargains in the air. Add to that the fact that it has the lowest noise print of any similarly sized jet and meets all current emissions standards, our Surveyor is kind to the environment as well.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

ACCURATE AERIAL MAPS FROM SPACE FOR MINING OPERATIONS

Saturday, August 20th, 2011

MAPPING FROM SPACE FOR MINERS

PhotoSat

Highly accurate elevation mapping of mine sites

Stereo satellite mapping accuracies better than 50cm in elevation validated by thousands of ground survey points over multiple project areas. Accuracies are achieved using PhotoSat’s own mapping system specially designed for stereo satellite photos. Mine sites and development projects mapped throughout the world.

To view white papers on mapping accuracies click here. For case histories using PhotoSat’s mapping system click here.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

THIS EVER SHRINKING WORLD MAKES IT EASIER TO ACCESS GOODS WORLDWIDE

Friday, February 26th, 2010

A WORLD HUNGRY FOR TRADE

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The commodity market activity  throughout the world has to keep moving between countries to ensure that all have a share of the global wealth and resources.

There are some who are not ‘pulling their weight whilst others are producing abundantly. These things are like that for different reasons.

Here we will bring them and others, together at a common market place where all can exchange goods and or services or sell for cash to the highest bidder or ready buyer.

MORE TO COME SO WATCH THIS SPACEeyes-22

Henry Sapiecha

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