Archive for May, 2015

Romania opens door to new gold, copper project with Canadians at the forefront

Saturday, May 30th, 2015

 romania-opens-door-to-new-gold-copper-project-led-by-canadians image www.www-g;obalcommodities.com

Romania’s National Agency for Mineral Resources has granted Canadian explorer Carpathian Gold Inc. (TSX:CPN) a 20-year mining license for its Rovina Valley gold and copper project, strategically located about 20 km west of Gabriel Resources’ (TSX:GBU) debated Rosia Montana.

This is first time Romania grants a mining license without the involvement of a state-owned enterprise.

Carpathian’s stock soared on the news. It was up 200% to 0.0150 at 11:00 am ET.

The Toronto based company, through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Samax Romania S.R.L., will now work on updating the Preliminary Economic Assessment of 2010, to provide revised project costs and evaluate scalability options, Carpathian said in a statement.

The Rovina License lies within the Metalliferi Mountains, in the southern part of the Apuseni Mountains, in the area known as the Golden Quadrilateral, one of Europe’s most prolific mining districts for over 2,000 years.

romanian-golden-quadrilateral mines map image www.www-globalcommodities.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Henry Sapiecha

The Lunar Gold Rush: How Moon Mining Could Work [infographic]

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Humans are already going to extremes to get natural resources. Gold and platinum mines in South Africa go as deep as almost 4 km into the Earth’s crust, which is about twice the depth of the Grand Canyon.

Meanwhile, up high in the Andes are some of the biggest copper and gold operations in the world. In Peru, La Rinconada is the world’s highest permanent settlement at 5,100 m, and it is situated strategically between many artisanal gold deposits in the mountains.

However, there are two frontiers that humans are still exploring in their early stages: the deep sea and spacial bodies such as asteroids, planets, and the moon. Today’s infographic covers the prospect of moon mining.

While we often think of the moon as a pretty barren landscape, it turns out moon mining could take advantage of many natural resources present on the lunar surface.

moon mining image www.www-globalcommodities.com

Water is vital in space for a multitude of reasons, such as for use in human consumption, agriculture, or hydrogen fuel. It’s also cost prohibitive to transport water to space anytime we may need it from earth. Scientists are now confident that the moon has a variety of water sources, including water locked up in minerals, scattered through the broken-up surface, and potentially in blocks or sheets at depth.

Helium-3 is a rare isotope of helium. Currently the United States produces only 8kg of it per year for various purposes. Helium-3 is a sought-after resource for fusion energy and energy research.

Lastly, rare earth elements (REEs) are also at high concentrations on the moon. KREEP (Potassium, REEs, and Phosphorus) is a geochemical mixture of some lunar impact breccia rocks and is expected to be extremely common on the moon. This mix also has other important substances embedded, such as uranium, thorium, fluorine, and chlorine.

If a lunar colony is indeed in our future, moon mining operations may be an important component of it.

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

moon mining infographic image www.www-globalcommodities.com

 

 

 

 

 

Aluminum – the metal extraordinaire see the infographic

Friday, May 8th, 2015

Aluminum (or aluminium) is the world’s most common metal by crustal abundance, making up 8.2% of mass. It’s more common than iron (5.6%) and a whopping 1200x more abundant than copper.

However, it wasn’t discovered until 1827, and it was too expensive to isolate the metal. That all changed in 1886 when a college student in the US did an experiment in his woodshed

aluminum-infographic

Courtesy of: Visual Capitalist

Aluminum (or aluminium) is the world’s most common metal by crustal abundance, making up 8.2% of mass. It’s more common than iron (5.6%) and a whopping 1200x more abundant than copper.

Despite its prevalence, aluminum was not isolated all the way until 1827. This is because it occurs only in compounds, and never in a free form. It also turns out that removing aluminum from these compounds is quite difficult, and an inexpensive process wasn’t discovered until 1886 by a college student in the United States. Charles Martin Hall was interested in the problem, and ran an electric current through a molten mixture of cryolite and aluminum oxide in a wood shed behind his house.

That dropped the price of aluminum drastically, and it became a household metal. Behind iron, aluminum is now the second most used metal in the world. Aluminum can now be found in everything: transportation (planes, cars, and more), buildings, machinery, consumer durables, packaging, and electrical uses.

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Henry Sapiecha

We are the world’s largest silver producer: KGHM

Friday, May 8th, 2015

kghm-silver-number-one-largest-producer-300x250 image www.www-globalcommodities.com

[News release submitted by KGHM] – KGHM has regained its first position in the world’s silver production.

Thomson Reuters’s analysts have recently compared results of all leading producers of this metal. In 2014, KGHM produced 1,256 tons of silver, which is 7 percent more than in the previous year.

The World Silver Survey is one of the key annual reports on silver and the only to rank all producers of this metal. The survey is prepared by the GFMS team of global metals market analysts at Thomson Reuters. It is a synthesis of the silver market’s key indicators, comprehensive statistics and in-depth economic analyses. Information in the report is based on financial figures published by companies and interviews with their representatives.

This allows for reliable data on the global silver supply and demand to published in the report each year.

“It took us one year to regain our leadership position in the silver market. In 2013, we were ranked as third silver producer. In the previous year, however, we raised production by 7 percent due to optimum ore processing and smelting activities,” said Herbert Wirth, President and CEO of KGHM.

Poland was ranked in the eighth position as the largest silver producer.

The report is prepared in co-operation with Silver Insitute. It has been published since 1990, which means it is the 25th jubilee edition.

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Henry Sapiecha
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